Trick Or Treatment: Beware Of Common Eye Care Hoaxes

October 13, 2011  -  Posted by  admin

Keep your eyes far away from these different vision hoaxes.

With the Halloween holiday coming up, everything around us seems to be transforming itself into a world that is much scarier and trickier than before. From children running around in playful masks and costumes, to the aisles of our favorite stores being stocked full of skeletons, ghosts and candy bowls that are not quite as innocent and inviting as they seem.

And while we have come to expect these haunting tricks and treats during Halloween activities and trips to our local haunted houses, the last place that we would ever expect to be deceived is in the products and advertisements directed towards our vision health.

While most of the information that you hear promoting healthy eyes and strong vision is dedicated towards improving your overall quality of life, there are several areas where you should be a little more cautious when it comes to the health of your eyesight and the products that you purchase.

Here are just a few eye care products that are currently being advertised to the average consumer that you should be cautious of. While some of these products may seem like a great way to get healthy vision, these eye care hoaxes could end up doing more damage to your vision than good.

Do-It-Yourself LASIK

In early 2006, just in time for April Fool’s Day, a new website popped up on the internet which advertised “state-of-the-art” technology that gives you the same effects of LASIK eye surgery from the comfort of your own home. The product claimed to work by using an actual at home laser device to cut a small flap in the cornea of your eye, then another separate laser to vaporize a section of the lens without damaging the surrounding tissue. The product even tricked quite a few people who sought to purchase the at-home laser kit, only to be directed to a site selling t-shirts and coffee mugs during check out.

Don’t be fooled―No matter how convincing or impressive the products may look, any service that promotes LASIK from home, or LASIK eye surgery “kits” should always be regarded as a hoax.

Anti-Glaucoma Diet

Within the last few years, many different diets and nutritional supplements have been popping up that promote a quick fix to eye diseases such as glaucoma. While there are several different foods and vitamins that can help to improve the health of your vision and aid in the protection against certain diseases, there is no set diet that can cure eye diseases such as glaucoma.

Therefore, do not be tempted by articles online or in health magazines that encourage patients to switch from eye drops or pills to miracle diets or vision nutritional supplements. Doing so may prevent you from receiving the proper treatment that you need.

Vision Improvement Cell Phone Apps

As anyone with a smart phone or iPad can happily tell you, there seems to be an app for everything in this day and age. However, it is important to keep an open mind about the authenticity and abilities of these apps. While some cell phone applications do a great job of diagnosing eye problems such as cataracts and glass prescriptions, especially when used in a third world environments with little access to eye care, there are some cell phone applications available, from .99 cents all the way to $100, that have unfounded claims.

Beware of apps which endorse unrealistic guarantees from their app, such as the ability to eliminate the need for reading glasses through a serious of simple exercises. While the apps may be fun and interesting, they should never substitute for an examination made by a qualified eye care professional.

As with any other sort of product that promises to provide “a quick, easy fix” or a “miraculous change,” it is important to remember that if a product sounds too good to be true, it usually is. And, if you’re still unsure about the authenticity of a product or service, you can always ask your eye doctor about whether or not the advertisement is legitimate. After all, as a professional, they are the best resource that you have regarding the health and improvement of your eye sight.

 

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Trick Or Treatment: Beware Of Common Eye Care Hoaxes is a post from: EyeCare 20/20

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